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Job Hunter's Guide Course
Introduction | Assess | Prepare | Search | Contact | Interview | Maintain


Step One:   Assess Yourself

Job hunting begins with an assessment. You have to know what type of job you want before you can find it. You see what you've got, what you need, what works and what doesn't.

Upon completion of this section:

  1. You will be able to describe your personal characteristics, values, aptitudes, skills and interests.
  2. You will be able to define and describe what you can offer employers.
  3. You will summarize what skills, knowledge and experience you need to gain.

Goals

The goal of assessing yourself is for you to better understand what jobs interest you and the type of work you can do best.

We have prepared several exercises to help you realize what you can offer employers and what skills, knowledge and experience you may need to gain.   Simply go through the exercises and make your choices.  

You may find it easier to print the assessment section so you can work on it. The printout will help you prepare your resume and job applications as you begin your job hunt.


Characteristics Inventory

Employers want employees with certain positive characteristics. Let's find out which qualities you possess.

Below are different qualities. For each quality, indicate whether you are that way yes, no or maybe. Select the first thing that comes to your mind. You may find it easier to print the assessment section so you can work on it. The printout will help you prepare your resume and job applications as you begin your job hunt.


Job Values Inventory

Next let's find out which job qualities you value most. From the list below choose the 5 qualities you want in a job. Select the first thing that comes to your mind.


Aptitude Assessment

Now let's find out what abilities you naturally have. For each item, rate your ability as high, medium or low. Select the first thing that comes to your mind.

Finger dexterity
The ability to move fingers rapidly and to accurately manipulate small objects. Used in playing guitar, doing puzzles and sewing on buttons. Related occupations include Jeweler, Photographer, Plumber and Tailor.

Motor coordination
The ability to use eyes and arms/hands and legs/feet rapidly and accurately in precise movements. Used in playing football, moving furniture and dancing. Related occupations include Hairdresser, Athlete, Machinist and Carpenter.

Form perception
The ability to see detail in objects, such as the shapes of figures and widths/lengths of lines. Used in making sketches, sorting differently sized nails and measuring areas by sight. Related occupations include Architect, Artist, Surveyor and Mechanic.

Spatial perception
The ability to understand forms in space and their relationships. Used in reading blueprints, solving geometric problems and planning where to place furniture in a room. Related occupations include Interior Designer, Drafter, Engineer and Air Traffic Controller.

Clerical perception
The ability to identify detail in written or verbal material containing words or numbers. Used in taking telephone messages, proofreading letters and checking bank statements. Related occupations include Bookkeeper, Editor and Teller.

General learning
The ability to "catch on," to understand, reason and make judgments. Used in memorizing facts, making decisions and reading instructions. Related occupations include Musician, Historian and Teacher.

Numerical
The ability to perform arithmetical work quickly and accurately. Used in balancing a checkbook, estimating food prices and figuring interest rates. Related occupations include Budget Analyst, Nuclear Engineer, Bookkeeper and Loan Officer.

Verbal
The ability to understand meanings of words and associated ideas and use them effectively. Used in making speeches, giving messages and writing reports. Related occupations include Clergy, Counselor, Marketing Manager and Sales Reps.


Skills Assessment

There are two types of skills:   Transferable and Technical skills. Transferable Skills are skills that apply to a lot of jobs. Technical Skills are skills that are more highly specialized. Rate yourself as high, medium or low for each skill listed. Select the first thing that comes to your mind.

Transferable Skills- skills that apply to a lot of jobs.

Technical Skills - skills that are more highly specialized.


Interest and Personality Assessment

You will find there are six personality types listed.

  1. Realistic: A "Doer"
  2. Investigative: A "Thinker"
  3. Artistic: A "Creator"
  4. Enterprising: A "Persuader"
  5. Social: A "Helper"
  6. Conventional: An "Organizer"

Below are descriptions for each personality type. The goal is to pick the ONE personality type that is most like you.

Realistic: A "Doer"

Are you...

Can you...

Do you like to...

Then you might make a good...

Investigative: A "Thinker"

Are you...

Can you...

Do you like to...

Then you might make a good...

Artistic: A "Creator"

Are you...

Can you...

Do you like to...

Then you might make a good...

Enterprising: A "Persuader"

Are you...

Can you...

Do you like to...

Then you might make a good...

Social: A "Helper"

Are you...

Can you...

Do you like to...

Then you might make a good...

Conventional: An "Organizer"

Are you...

Can you...

Do you like to...

Then you might make a good...

 


Assessment Completion

Finally, we are done with assessment.

Use the selections you made during this Assessment section to:


Completion of Assess. Continue to the next section or any other section.

Introduction | Assess | Prepare | Search | Contact | Interview | Maintain

Texas Work Prep LMS
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